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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world.additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and millicent bell, through the millicent and eugene bell foundation. major funding for this program is provided by the kendeda fund. >> chicago is now under full national security. >> a no-fly zone is in effect, except for the world leaders who are landing at o'hare, as president barack obama and a number of world leaders... >> hockenberry: it was a big weekend in chicago. last spring, the president was in town, along with the leaders of nato, to discuss threats to global security and nuclear proliferation. at a huge convention center, the eyes of the world were watching. >> ...that demands globa
in the neolithic age. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was the starkest statement yet on the possible effect of automatic federal budget cuts, due to begin in nine days, on march first. defense secretary leon panetta notified his entire civilian work force that employees could be sent home without pay. the warning was aimed at defense department workers at the pentagon and around the world. secretary panetta sent them a written message, as he left for a nato defense ministers meeting in brussels. in it, he said there are limited options for coping with the looming across-the-board cuts. and, he said: >> on our civilians it will be catastrophic. >> woodruff: within hours, top pentagon officials were out, saying employees could lose one day of work per week for 22 weeks. civilians
with pbs, that is really what you have with this station. it is a relationship. and when you turn to public television, you expect quality, variety integrity, and you trust us to be unbiased and truthful. in fact, year after year, the roper public opinion poll has shown that americans consider pbs to be their most trusted source for news and public affairs information. and parents trust us to provide their children with a safe haven where they can learn and be respected for being just the way they are. we take our role in this relationship very seriously. we work to bring you programs that value your time and respect you as an intelligent person. when you turn on this station, we hope you are inspired surprised, moved to tears or moved to take action, and ultimately we hope you feel the time you spent here was time well spent. you look to us to add richness and meaningful experiences to your life, and we look to you to make this all possible, because we rely on your financial support-- that's the truth! please call the number on your screen and supp
and film club. pbs.org. this program is available on dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org, or call us at 1-800-play-pbs. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org masterpiece is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from: host: coming up on chesapeake collectibles ... guest: he had quite a history. he was with mcclellan when they crossed into virginia, and was wounded at chancellorsville. i still have the bullets out of his leg. appraiser: most significant libraries would want a copy of almost any book. in fact, even the library of congress apparently doesn't have this. appraiser: what's like the most you paid for some of these pieces? guest: you know, anywhere from $1 to $20, but the average piece is maybe $3 to $5. [ trolley bell rings ] [ horse hooves clopping ] [ train whistle blows ] [ steam rises ] announcer: chesapeake collectibles is made possible in part by the mpt new initiatives fund founded by irene & edward h. kaplan. major funding is also provided by aarp. jeff gordon: for some this line is a convenience. but for oth
was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from: led, "the first fourth of july." i have this party every year on the fourth of july, and i think it will be great when my friends come in and they'll be able to see that painting just as they walk in the front door. i thought, "ooh, my goodness "i think i have a little treasure here. "i'm not going to say anything to anybody. i'm just going to bid on it." sold, $60, to you, buyer 229. buyer: i was very happy with the price, but i would have bought it at any cost. i purchased the 19th-century elephant garden stool. i love garden stools; i think they're beautiful. today they're mass-produced and it's hard to find some that are a little bit older. i love the colors, i love the shape i love the condition that it was in. i think it would be beautiful in between two chairs or at the end of the sofa. i got it for $150, and i thought that was a very fair price and it's either going to stay with me or it's going to move on to another home and it's going to be beautiful. what a lovely set of luggage. these were exce
. ouch. >>> british drama "downton abbey" raked in 8.2 million viewers. thanks to "downton" pbs has quadrupled its prime time average. >> we all know what the winners of the oscars get. what about the losers? the runners-up will be taking home swag bags totaling $45,000. that includes trips to australia, hawaii, condoms and tequila. >> those go with you to australia and howe. >> they certainly do. appointments for injectable fillers. and portion-control dinner ware. in case any of the losers plan to diet. >>> turning now to a story from portland, oregon, where a sea otter is making a splash by showing off his basketball skills. eddie, the sea otter, definitely knows how to take it to the rack. the aging animal learned this trick after his arthritic elbows became a concern that caused him some concern. the exercises worked and he's been hooping it up ever since. can we keep him up a little longer? >> he's pretty cute. >> he doesn't show boat either. >> this is not show boating? >> no, he doesn't brag. >> what's funny, are a arthritic elbows? how do they know he had that. >> i'm mara
with a conversation with gloria steinem about the women's movement and the pbs documentary, "makers: women who make america." >> we have realized that a majority of americans fully agree that women can do what men can do but we haven't yet realized that men can do what women do. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
viewers for its finale. pbs has quadrupled its primetime average. >>> the runner-ups at the oscars will be taking home swag bags valued at $4500. >>> what are they saying? >> well, this is "first look" on msnbc. "way too early" with guest host peter alexander starts right now. ♪ >>> did you see the pictures of president obama playing golf with tiger woods this weekend? neither did we. >> the media covering the president was shut out. the press corps complained. >> there are a lot of holes in the story, specifically, 18 of them. but i believe america deserves to know, who drove the cart? who rode shotgun? did the president play from the woman's tee? fol folks, you're just as upset as i am, i can tell.
for diabetic nerve pain. to hear more of phyllis's story, visit lyrica.com. >>> tonight, pbs will debut the groundbreaking women's stories assembled on video. the makers documentary tells the stories of 160 women who have helped shape america through the women movement, including the 19 1960 protest. >> we did have a sense of humor and we had outrageousness. >> we had a freedom trash can through which we called object of women's oppression, like brooms and dust pans and curlers and high-heeled shoes and girdles. >> joining me a author and activist. what a pleasure to have you both here. >> good to be here. >> a lot of people have called this the birth of the women's movement. >> i know. >> where are we and how has it changed? >> well, we are huge and it's worldwide and it's passionate and sophisticated and it's changed lives in a way that i think sometimes younger women don't fully -- can't fully grasp because we're an ahistoric country here. for example, when i got married, i was a published writer so i used my own name and i was shocked to discover that i couldn't use my driver's lice
of the schools used. it will air on pbs february 28. 26 degrees out. still ahead, funeral services will be held for the former new york city mayor. good morning. get up and get going. a lot of us bleary-eyed after super bowl. 5:11 is the time. a kind of chilly day. clipper headed our way to bring another dusting of snow. adam, can you just take all of these and make them into one big >> we[no audio] hear adam. i know the answer was yes. these temperatures for you, we waking up to 23 degrees in washington. germantown, 24 this morning. 23.mbia is we will have increasing clouds someghout the day after morning sunshine. between 34mperatures and 38 degrees. we do have a warm up on the way. .r details on that dusting coming up in just a few minutes. try to regain audio his so we can hear thoughts and feelings on the upcoming snow. in the meantime, we will go to traffic. >> thank you so much. for our early birds hitting the , good. no problems to report. a quiet start. i hope it stays that way. good morning to our nation's capital. no problems to report. , making thevenue trip into virginia -- north o
300 pbs states. >>> science is backing up the notion that women talk more than men. researchers at the university of maryland conducted the new study. they found that women use about 20,000 words a day while men speak only about 7,000. the that theyness is linked to a protein found in the brain called fox-t-2. >> 20,000? you've got you beat big time. >> i'd like to think that maybe women are more exuberant communicator communicators. >> see, i don't ehave exuberant in my vocabulary. >> women have a lot to say. >>> a controversy involving one nation's top coals right here. why people are so upset about the renovations to thomas jefferson high school. >>> and veronica, you have some big news and we're not just talking about the weather. >> oh, that's -- there you go. that's right. we're talking about chili, right? we'll talk about that on the other side of the break, but first the bigger news will be the fact that, hey, wre dealing with a storm moving this way. tonight dry, no problems. in fact, most of tomorrow morning should be dry, but still could have in issues. we'll talk abo
. at the time i want my co-host to come out here. he's the host of pbs's design squad. and he is uber smart. mit grad. has his own company. hold on nate. how do you feel about winning the ipad mini? >> good. >> what's your name? >> garret. >> where are you from? >> houston. >> you are enjoying dc? >> yup. >> here we go. >> all of you that have been watching, i've got this thing in my ear they are talking to me, i've got this going on here. now we're ready to announce our top five. at least the first one live on tv. are you game for that? all right. so i'll let you do it. >> we can't in good conscious make you wait another minute. the first team i announce are going to stay here while the other four teams will be escorted to the potomic 4 room and it will be sequestered. the five finalist teams are. midatlantic. >> that's our local team. all right. come on up. you guys remember we featured them live in our 7:00 hour and they are one of the top five finalists. okay. let me ask. do i have time to do the other four teams? yes. okay. here we go. quickly. the next top finalist is from philadelphia. [
of -- lot of news about this issue. in january, pbs's "nov a" had a documentary called "rise of the drones," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title, and, of course, the administration's use of drones for targeting terrorists to con cronet our war on terrorism has come to be a central issue in the confirmation hearing of the proposed cia directer, the nominee, john brennan. however, privacy issues and military applications of uas beyond the scope of this hearing. i use the term "unmanned aircraft systems" or usa instead of uas or drones because it is a more complete term. uas are complex systems made up of not just aircraft, but as well as supporting ground, air, and communications infrastructure. uas comes in a variety of shapes and sizes and carries out a wide range of missions. aviation has come a long way in a relatively short period of time thanks to american innovation and i think newty. the list of pioneers in aviation and aerospace is very long. you may not know the details of the achievement, but i'm shore you know names like cesna, james mcdonald and donald d
about young's life "the power broker" will be the airing february 18th as part of the pbs series "independent lenses." and we are joined now by his niece who is the producer and executive producer of "the power broker." everybody on my team is watching the film, and let's start with t the number one critique of whitney young in his life and the one that the fillp takes on directly, and that is because he was not marching in the streets and instead working in the board rooms that he was an uncle tom or somehow selling out the civil rights movement, and how does this film make it on and give us a new and reclaimed whitney young? >> well, this film points out that whitney young understood more roles to play and the more sophisticated one got into the movement and everybody understood that, that malcolm x had a role the play and whitney young had a role the play, and it is important that we think in a nuanced way that, you know, everybody's p opiniopinion coul into the mix and move forward so the fact that he was in the board room meant that he was in a different venue and working be
and delicious. >> the latest from pbs. 300 television stations will be airing the new spot, part of the first lady's third anniversary of the law new campaign. "washington journal" will continue. colin goddard is involved in the british campaign. john reed taking a look at china's cyber attacks, the impact in the u.s., and the u.s. response. "washington journal" continues for this friday, february 27 -- 22nd. we're back in a moment. ♪ >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest winnows in the colonies. during the revolution, while in her mid-40s, she was considered an enemy by the british to threaten to take her hostage. later, she would become our nation's first firstly at age 57. meet martha washington monday night in the first program of c- span's weekly series "first lady's." will visit some of the places that influenced her life, including colonial was -- colonial williamsburg, valley forge, and philadelphia. the part of the conversation with your phone calls, tweets, and facebook posts, live monday night at 9:00 eastern on c-span. >> think it is pretty accurate that they do not play b
pbs than any other network with 52%. >> bill: 46% don't trust fox. >> let me just say as someone who monitors the media and respects what journalists do -- [ laughter ] that is great news! >> bill: the public is finally waking up to the fact that fox news is not fair and balanced! >> senator mitch mcconnell is a happy kentucky basketball fan. the hill reporting the senate minority leader was visited yesterday by university of kentucky basketball coach john calipari. he gave him a piece of the floor that kentucky made on in new orleans last april when they won the ncaa championship. he'll hang that in his office. coach is in washington for the national prayer breakfast this morning. >> bill: there it is. somehow i wasn't invited. maybe because i've been invited for the last 15 years and i've never gone. i think it is an outrage that we have a national prayer breakfast. it violates everything we believe in about separation of church and state. for the president to go it is it is damn disgraceful. >> we talked about a replica oval office that the president was going to move into while t
now. >> big bird goes on to jump and dance, sort of. it will air on 320 pbs stations the first lady will spent the next week traveling to highlight the progress the program has made in the last three years. house democrats are working to keep at attention on republicans refusal to work with the president to stop with the sequester. the dccc is lawn -- launching an ad today talking about what will have. the online video targets tea party republicans in 27 congressional districts. house republicans are intent on moving ahead with their legislative agenda just assuming the sequester will happen, and the spending cuts will stay in place through the end of the year. we'll be back with more show after the break. we'll see you on the other side. stay with us. ♪ going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out.
fatigue, town hall part two, and this week's must-reads. we have political editor of the pbs news hour christina bellantone, robert traynumb, a georgetown university dean, and ed rendell, an nbc news political analyst. hello. nice to see you here. >> hello, there. >> robert, let's go to the blame game fatigue. let's take a listen to the first question that governor bobby jindal was asked on "meet the press" today. >> local air traffic control is on the funding block with this sequestration. and you heard the secretary say this is real disruption because they've got to cut a billion dollars. >> you know, the president, and you heard right, compared the president to lincoln. we need real presidential leadership here. the president needs to stand up to the plate. >> governor jindal's first instinct was just to blame the president, not talk about his state, for example. i mean, why shouldn't the american public be frustrated about this? it seems like it's always pointingpoint ing fingers and nobody taking a mirror and turning it on themselves and saying here's where i can do better. >> you
. >> levar burton, leslie uggams, louis gosset jr., thank you very much. >> airing tomorrow night on pbs. >>> head coach john harbaugh, next. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> back now at 8:45. he is on top of the football world this morning. john harbaugh, head coach of the super bowl winning baltimore ravens is with us from baltimore this morning. coach, congratulations. >> thank you very much. it's great to be with you guys. >> a lot of people would start an interview asking about the game. i'm not going to do that. i'm going to ask about the power outage. what was going through your mind at that moment? >> just stunned. i looked up and i said i think the lights went out. it was really a great observation there. it was just crazy. we haven't seen that one before. that was new. >> coach, did that change the dynamic of this game? you were up 28-6. lights go out. all of a sudden it looks like the 49ers get second life there. >> it did change the whole complexion. they did a great job. they changed momentum. it wasn't the lights, power o outage, it was the 49ers. not unexpected. going
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)